Topics in education: the Cincinnati lectures of 1959 on the philosophy of education

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As Robert C. As a thinking, visceral intellect is a certain kind of feeling, one that orients and suffuses thought. It possesses—no: it is—thought but as rhythmically distinct from what usually passes as thought. The connecting insight here, which binds judgment to sensory experience, is far more artistic than intellectual or systematic in nature. Doing so, I believe, produces results contrary to the stated aims of Insight.

Good heavens! It is to say that applying it directly in an artistic discourse to direct that discourse is problematic and can be restrictive. Thus, artistic thinking expresses the normative in terms of a function of being, an interstice of becoming, rather than a structure of determinate operations. Enecstasis is my term for this function. Perhaps I should turn to a positive application. Currently in religious studies a form of theorizing exists that is in critical contention with phenomenology of religion.

The ideological divide that these approaches represent, the phenomenological and new materialism, is a modern iteration of traditional methodological disputes between humanists and social scientists respectively. Enecstatic reflection provides students of religion with an opportunity to engage in the normative issues that Lonergan points to that divide scholars of religion methodologically.

Why do it this way? But they would be hard-pressed to accept formalizations of it in terms of foundational methodology. In the interests of having students and colleagues feel the force of negotiating the normative in religious studies, I refrain from making transcendental method requisite to the task. What he also did was to use elements of the very scholarship that barricade engagement with biblical truths to pave a way to newfound appreciations of these truths in terms of elemental meaning.

This resembles my context of negotiating social-scientific, new-materialist presuppositions enecstatically whose reflex it is to bar normative reflection from religious studies. But whereas McEvenue does this in a literary-critical context with respect to the foundational stances of biblical authors, I do it in religious studies with respect to the foundational stances of theorists of religion.

In war? In family life? In obeying the law? In prayer? I ask the question, what philosophical presupposition in this theory of, or method in, religion masks a foundational stance that invites development or necessitates reversal? My only concern here has been to flag an approach that has informed my creation of a philosophy of religion for religious studies. In many respects, and ironically, McEvenue has had a greater impact on it than Lonergan and for the rather pedestrian reason that McEvenue wrestles with elemental meaning, an issue of artistry, and dialectic and foundations in a way that moves from transcendental method to hermeneutics.

Hermeneutics, you remember, Friedrich Schleiermacher described as art. McEvenue simply assumes it. In the same way, I think—no, I hope!

Publisher of Philosophical Texts

Lonergan has taught me the importance of self-discovery in the terms and categories that informed his personal struggle with the flight from understanding Lonergan , 9. McEvenue taught me how to solicit this awareness by example, that is, by focusing on, while being sensitive to, controversies and issues pertinent in my field, a field like others that seem to be forever tragically involved in a dialectic of self-discovery and self-alienation.

These developments have also rendered problematic the bias in new materialism against normative reflection in religious studies, which is odd to say given that new materialism is in alliance with such issue-based orientations. The blind spot here seems to be the politicization of academic inquiry as object-constitutive, issue-based, rather than subject-constitutive, interiority-based, as in the discourses of Lonergan, McEvenue, and others.

Still, it masks a level of normative reflection in new materialism that new materialists themselves, in their desire to exclude theological reflection from religious studies, have a vested interest in being selective about. As Shiela Greeve Davaney , writes,. These are indeed not impartial values. They have emerged within human history including from within human religious history and represent certain cultural values and options over others. They present opportunities, in other words, to rethink, to re-appreciate, the contributions of our mentors as we look for a way forward.

Davaney, Shiela Greeve. Linell E. Cady and Delwin Brown. Kanaris, Jim. Lonergan, Bernard. Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan, vol. Edited by Robert M. Doran and Frederick E. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Insight: A Study of Human Understanding. Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan, volume 3. Edited by Fredrick E. Crowe and Robert M. Lonergan, S.

~ an interstice of random thoughts

Edited by William F. Ryan and Bernard J. McEvenue, Sean. Interpretation and Bible: Essays on Truth in Literature. It possesses—no: it is—thought but as rhythmically distinct from what usually passes as thought. The connecting insight here, which binds judgment to sensory experience, is far more artistic than intellectual or systematic in nature. Doing so, I believe, produces results contrary to the stated aims of Insight.

Good heavens!

Vol 15 No 1 (1995): February

It is to say that applying it directly in an artistic discourse to direct that discourse is problematic and can be restrictive. Thus, artistic thinking expresses the normative in terms of a function of being, an interstice of becoming, rather than a structure of determinate operations.


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Enecstasis is my term for this function. Perhaps I should turn to a positive application. Currently in religious studies a form of theorizing exists that is in critical contention with phenomenology of religion. The ideological divide that these approaches represent, the phenomenological and new materialism, is a modern iteration of traditional methodological disputes between humanists and social scientists respectively.

Enecstatic reflection provides students of religion with an opportunity to engage in the normative issues that Lonergan points to that divide scholars of religion methodologically. Why do it this way?

Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan | Encanto Editions

But they would be hard-pressed to accept formalizations of it in terms of foundational methodology. In the interests of having students and colleagues feel the force of negotiating the normative in religious studies, I refrain from making transcendental method requisite to the task. What he also did was to use elements of the very scholarship that barricade engagement with biblical truths to pave a way to newfound appreciations of these truths in terms of elemental meaning.

This resembles my context of negotiating social-scientific, new-materialist presuppositions enecstatically whose reflex it is to bar normative reflection from religious studies. But whereas McEvenue does this in a literary-critical context with respect to the foundational stances of biblical authors, I do it in religious studies with respect to the foundational stances of theorists of religion. In war? In family life? In obeying the law? In prayer? I ask the question, what philosophical presupposition in this theory of, or method in, religion masks a foundational stance that invites development or necessitates reversal?

My only concern here has been to flag an approach that has informed my creation of a philosophy of religion for religious studies. In many respects, and ironically, McEvenue has had a greater impact on it than Lonergan and for the rather pedestrian reason that McEvenue wrestles with elemental meaning, an issue of artistry, and dialectic and foundations in a way that moves from transcendental method to hermeneutics.

Hermeneutics, you remember, Friedrich Schleiermacher described as art. McEvenue simply assumes it. In the same way, I think—no, I hope! Lonergan has taught me the importance of self-discovery in the terms and categories that informed his personal struggle with the flight from understanding Lonergan , 9. McEvenue taught me how to solicit this awareness by example, that is, by focusing on, while being sensitive to, controversies and issues pertinent in my field, a field like others that seem to be forever tragically involved in a dialectic of self-discovery and self-alienation.

These developments have also rendered problematic the bias in new materialism against normative reflection in religious studies, which is odd to say given that new materialism is in alliance with such issue-based orientations. The blind spot here seems to be the politicization of academic inquiry as object-constitutive, issue-based, rather than subject-constitutive, interiority-based, as in the discourses of Lonergan, McEvenue, and others.

Still, it masks a level of normative reflection in new materialism that new materialists themselves, in their desire to exclude theological reflection from religious studies, have a vested interest in being selective about. As Shiela Greeve Davaney , writes,. These are indeed not impartial values. They have emerged within human history including from within human religious history and represent certain cultural values and options over others. They present opportunities, in other words, to rethink, to re-appreciate, the contributions of our mentors as we look for a way forward.

Virtual International Authority File

Davaney, Shiela Greeve. Linell E. Cady and Delwin Brown. Kanaris, Jim. Lonergan, Bernard. Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan, vol. Edited by Robert M.

Publisher of Philosophical Texts

Doran and Frederick E. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Insight: A Study of Human Understanding. Collected Works of Bernard Lonergan, volume 3. Edited by Fredrick E. Crowe and Robert M. Lonergan, S. Edited by William F.


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